Monthly Archives: March 2009

Top 100 Habs: #16

#16: Ken Dryden

It wouldn’t be a stretch to call Ken Dryden the smartest man to have ever played hockey.

Ken Dryden

Ken Dryden

After a great season with the Montreal Canadiens where he captured the Stanley Cup and won the Conn Smythe trophy as the playoffs MVP, he followed that up with a year where he won the Calder trophy as rookie of the year.

Although he didn’t have as much NHL experience as other goalies, he was selected to be one of the starters when NHLers met their Russian counterparts in the 1972 Summit Series.

After another amazing year where he won the Stanley Cup and finished with 33 wins and seven losses, Dryden took the next season off so he could concentrate on finishing his law degree.

He continued to play great when he returned. In his seven full seasons with the team, Dryden never lost more than 10 games in a season, and won five Vezina trophies and six Stanley Cups.

He wrote one book during his career, and has written another four since then. The Game is seen as one of the best sports books of all time.

Dryden is now a two-time MP with the Government of Canada.

He was elected to the hall of fame in 1983.

For more on Ken Dryden:

Hockey Hall of Fame

Wikipedia

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Top 10 WWE divas hotties

Normally I do a top 10 list, but in honour of Wrestlemania 25 taking place this weekend, I thought I would do a top 25 WWF/WWE hotties.

It doesn’t matter how many shows they were on, how long they lasted, or when they were with the company.

And let me say, it’s probably not who you think it would be at #1.

So without further ado, here are the top 25!

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Top 100 Habs: #17

#17: Elmer Lach

Elmer Lach is usually seen as a set-up man for Maurice Richard, but Lach’s accomplishments stands out on their own.

Elmer Lach

Elmer Lach

After a sophmore season where he played one game because of an injury, Lach returned to the Montreal Canadiens full-time. In 45 games, he scored 18 goals and added 40 assists.

A couple of years later, he had 54 assists in 50 games (the year Richard score his famous 50 goals in 50 games). It was Lach who won the Hart trophy as the league’s most valuable player that season as he led the league in points.

Three years later, he again led the league in points, winning the first Art Ross trophy, notching 61 points in 60 games.

Throughout most of his career, Lach was a point a game player. He won three Stanley Cups with the Habs (as a funny aside, he scored the Cup winning goal in 1953: During the celebrations, Richard accidently broke Lach’s nose with his stick).

He was elected to the hall of fame in 1966.

For more on Elmer Lach:

Hockey Hall of Fame

Wikipedia

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Top 100 Habs: #18

#18: George Hainsworth

George Hainsworth set a shutout record that will probably never be seen again.

George Hainsworth

George Hainsworth

In his first three years in the league with the Montreal Canadiens, Hainsworth played extremely well. He recorded double digits in shutouts in each of those season. In 1928-29, he set a NHL record 22 shutouts in 44 games, good for a shutout every single game he played. He also had a goals against average of 0.92.

In those three seasons, he won the Vezina trophy, named for the man he replaced in nets.

The rules were changed the following season to allow forward passes (it wasn’t allowed in the league to that point). Hainsworth still played superbly, and led the Habs to the Stanley Cup the next two seasons.

In 1930, he set a record of going 270 minutes and 8 seconds  of playoff hockey without allowing a goal.

In 1932-33, he became captain of the Canadiens, a rarity.

He was elected to the hall of fame in 1961.

For more on George Hainsworth:

Hockey Hall of Fame

Wikipedia

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Top 100 Habs: #19

#19: Serge Savard

There’s not many players in professional sports that have something named after them.

Serge Savard

Serge Savard

There’s the Gordie Howe hat trick, the Doyle Brunson poker hand, and the NBA Hack-a-Shaq to name a few.

Serge Savard has one of the most famous of the names, thanks to broadcaster Danny Gallivan. After watching Savard spin around an opponent, Gallivan called it the Savardian Spin-o-rama, and the name stuck.

Savard helped the Montreal Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in his rookie season, and upped his value the next year. Not only did the Habs repeat as champions in 1969, but Savard won the Conn Smythe trophy as the playoff MVP, the first defenceman to win the award.

In 18 years, 16 with the Canadiens, Savard won eight Stanley Cups. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1986.

While he was never a threat to score (only twice did he get double digits in goals), he was a rugged defensive player, and an important piece to Habs championships.

After his playing career, he became general manager of the Canadiens. While many of his moves were not popular (such as trading Chris Chelios for Denis Savard), he managed to put the pieces in place for two more Stanley Cups, in 1986 and 1993.

For more on Serge Savard:

Hockey Hall of Fame

Wikipedia

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Top 100 Habs: #20

#20: Bill Durnan

Bill Durnan is probably the greatest NHL goalie that no one has ever heard about.

Bill Durnan

Bill Durnan

How good was he? He won the Vezina trophy as the league’s top goalie for the first four years of his his career. In his first season with the Montreal Canadiens, he posted a record of 38 wins, five losses and seven ties in 50 games — as a rookie!

He followed that up with another 38-win season.

In total, he played only seven seasons in the league, but won the Vezina trophy six times.

He won two Stanley Cups with the Habs, and was elected to hall of fame in 1964.

He was also the captian of the Habs at one point, the last goalie to do so until Roberto Luongo of the Vancouver Canucks became their captain this season.

Two interesting stories about Durnan:

The first is that he almost never played professional hockey. The Canadiens wanted him, but Durnan had contract demands that the general manager of the Habs wouldn’t meet. So Durnan wouldn’t sign. The general manager finally caved in 10 minutes before the faceoff of the season opener (with no time to warm up, he led the Habs to a 2-2 tie).

The second is that he was ambidextrious. He wore special gloves that allowed him to use his stick or catch with either hand.

Durnan also set a record for the most consecutive shutouts, and the longest amount of time without letting a goal in, a record that lasted until 2004, when Brian Boucher of the Phoenix Coyotes broke it.

For more information on Bill Durnan:

Hockey Hall of Fame

Wikipedia

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Top 100 Habs: #21

#21: Bernie Geoffrion

Hundreds of today’s NHL players, thousands of players in the minors and millions of people across the world should give thanks to Bernie Geoffrion every time they pick up a hockey stick.

Bernie Boom Boom Geoffrion

Bernie "Boom Boom" Geoffrion

Geoffrion is credited with inventing the slapshot. Sure, someone else may have done it later on, but he was the first to use it as a method to score goals. Now, most players have the slapshot as their main weapon, especially defenceman (I’m looking at you, Mark Streit).

Geoffrion was born to play hockey for the Montreal Canadiens. He was born in Montreal, played various junior and minor hockey in Montreal, and played most of his career with the Habs.

He was nick-named Boom Boom for the noise the puck made after booming off the boards when Geoffrion would take a slapshot.

Geoffrion had a successful career as a Hab, even if the fans may not have realized it. He became the second player in NHL history to score 50 goals in a season. When he won the Art Ross trophy in 1955, many fans were upset because he passed teammate Maurice the Rocket Richard for the award (Richard was suspended).

Boom Boom was one of the toughest players the Habs have ever seen. He suffered an injury so severe that his life was saved by emergency surgery (he was actually given last rites at the hospital). The doctors told him to take a year off from hockey, but he was back on the ice six weeks later, playing in the playoffs.

He had teammate Doug Harvey cut a cast off his leg so he could play in the playoffs in 1961. He broke his nose nine times, had 400 stitches and had several stomach problems and operations.

In 14 seasons with the Habs, Geoffrion won six Stanley Cups, two Art Ross Trophies, a Calder trophy as the league’s best rookie and a Hart trophy as the league’s most valuable player.

He was elected to the hall of fame in 1972.

He died on March 11, 2006 from stomach cancer, the day his number was retired by the Canadiens.

For more on Bernie Geoffrion:

Hockey Hall of Fame

Wikipedia

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Top 100 Habs: #22

#22: Dickie Moore

Dickie Moore was a superb offensive NHL player, so much so he set a record for most points in a season, breaking Gordie Howe’s record.

Dickie Moore

Dickie Moore

Moore was signed by the Montreal Canadiens, and spent most of his career with the team.

He was an excellent passer, netting at least 20 assists a season throughout his time with the Canadiens. It was that ability that helped him win back to back Art Ross trophies as the league’s top point-getter in 1958 and 1959.

In 1959, he scored 41 goals and 95 points to set a new record for most points in a season.

He won six Stanley Cups, and was a member of the team that won five straight from 1956 to 1960.

He retired after the 1962-63 season, but played 38 games for the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1964-65. He retired again, but came back to play with the St. Louis Blues in 1967-68. He had eight points in 23 games, but rediscovered his scoring touch in the playoffs, getting seven goals and 14 points in 18 games to lead the Blues to the finals, where they lost to the Canadiens.

Moore was elected to the hall of fame in 1974.

For more on Dickie Moore:

Hockey Hall of Fame

Wikipedia

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Top 100 Habs: #23

#23: Jaques Lemaire

One thing you might be noticing as we get further into the top 100 Canadiens of all time is the fact most of the top players spent their entire careers with the Montreal Canadiens.

Jacques Lemaire

Jacques Lemaire

Many of the players were drafted by the Habs and groomed to continue on the success of the team.

Jacques Lemaire falls into this category. He spent his entire 12-year career with the Canadiens, and won eight Stanley Cups during that time.

He is one of only six players to have scored two Stanley-Cup clinching goals, including an overtime goal against Boston in 1977.

He scored at least 20 goals in every season he played, and is almost a point-per-game player in both regular season and post-season play.

After retiring, he went into coaching, where he won another two Stanley Cups with the Habs as an assistant (in 1986 and 93), and one with the New Jersey Devils as head coach in 1995.

He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1984.

For more on Jacques Lemaire:

Hockey Hall of Fame

Wikipedia

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Top 10 Law & Order hotties

 I decided to go a bit obscure this week. Everyone does lists of top good-looking Heroes, athletes, sportscasters.

But I don’t know if I’ve ever seen one for Law & Order. And so for that, my friends, here is the top 10 Law & Order Hotties.

Unfortunately, I don’t have time this week to write a small blurb after each one, but I hope the photos will do.

(Note: As usual, they had to have appeared in at least five episodes. Also, I made this list using all the Law & Order franchises, not just the main one).

 

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